Sep 10

Wounds of war – when the human fallout goes beyond the battlefield

And then there are the other, less immediately obvious wounds. The Australian  Defence Force says four Afghanistan veterans – one had also seen duty in Iraq –  have committed suicide.  All  were still in military service when they took  their lives. Accurate records are not kept of suicides among veterans once they  leave.  Thousands more will probably present with post-traumatic stress in coming years.
Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/national/wounds-of-war–when-the-human-fallout-goes-beyond-the-battlefield-20120420-1xcgo.html#ixzz262KJ1Qtr

Sep 02

Australian Defence Force Mental Health Reform Program

The highest rated barrier to seeking help was concern that it would reduce deployability (36.9%). The most frequently perceived stigma for ADF members was that people would treat them differently if they sought care (27.6%), and that seeking care would harm their career (26.9%).

Almost one in five personnel (17.9%) reported that they had sought help for a stress-related, emotional, mental health or family problem in the previous 12 months. However, only half the sample with post-traumatic stress disorder or depressive episodes reported receiving treatment in the previous 12 months and only 15% of those with alcohol dependence disorder.

 More….

Aug 31

Affects of PTSD on Australian soldiers unknown

Young Australian Soldiers fighting on the front line are returning home very different people and their families can hardly recognise them?

An increasing number of men and women serving in Australian forces are being diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) after their deployment. More…

Aug 31

Debriefing, Social Support and PTSD in the New Zealand Police

 

Abstract

Organisations whose workers risk traumatic exposure, are increasingly interested in preventing sequelae such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A common intervention is the provision of psychological debriefing following trauma. In accordance with recent criticisms of this approach, Harvey (1996) has proposed a multidimensional model of trauma recovery. The present study tested some of the person, event and environmental variables in the model with 527 New Zealand police officers who responded to a questionnaire survey of trauma and social support at work. The results showed no differences in PTSD symptoms between officers who had and those who had not been debriefed. However, greater social support and opportunities to talk about traumatic experiences and their emotional impact, with others in the work place, were shown to be related to fewer PTSD symptoms. The findings support current suggestions that organisational post-trauma interventions should be developed take into account social environmental factors and recovery needs over time. More…..

Aug 28

Inadequate support for our NZ war veterans

 

 

Aug 28

Criticism of NZ Defence Force Care Unfounded

Recent criticism in the media about the Government’s lack of support for ‘shell-shocked’ soldiers is unfounded says the NZ Defence Force.

Head of Health for the NZ Defence Force, Surgeon Captain (SGNCAPT) Alison Drewry says that all NZDF personnel deployed on operational missions receive psychological and physical health support before, during and after their deployment. More……..